Luke Jones est. MCMXC

I design beautiful, usable websites in the heart of Bristol, UK. This is a stream of my thoughts and opinions, all of which are my own. You can browse my posts and find me on twitter.


22 July 2014

The reset button

I rely on social media too much. I’m that guy who closes the Twitter tab in Chrome because I’m bored of looking at Twitter, then opens up a Twitter tab to see what’s going on in the world. I’m guilty of over-sharing, adding hashtags to my Instagram for likes, and just talking at people.

So I’ve hit the metaphorical reset button on my Twitter account. It’s a fresh start. All those following-me-because-they-don’t-want-to-hurt-my-feelings people can be free and my Twitter account can just be about having conversations with people now.


23 June 2014

Good design is pretty

Good design is not making something look pretty, but that doesn’t mean good design can’t be pretty. Good design ain’t pretty was a tongue-in-cheek title that needs further explanation.

Good design is not about making something pretty. It is about making something usable and intuitive – the beauty of the product will be a result of these things.

—An excerpt from my previous blog post, Good design ain’t pretty

I do not believe that a functional design cannot be beautiful. A good designer understands that design is more than a lick of paint. There are usability and interaction considerations a designer needs to make in every interface he or she works on.


24 April 2014

Good design ain’t pretty

Good design is not about making something pretty. It is about making something usable and intuitive – the beauty of the product will be a result of these things.

If you think about how something looks instead of how it works, you end up with this:

Victor’s OSX

A still from Victor Erixon’s idea for the next OSX. Click to open in new window

At face value, this design is pretty. It is trendy. The UI is nice and spacious. Some people would glance at it and think it was wonderful. Dig deeper however, and the design causes more problems than it solves.

What a user interface (UI) should do

For an established operating system like OSX, the purpose of the user interface is to make everything as easy to use, accessible, and intuitive. The end-user needs to be able to perform the necessary tasks in the shortest amount of time. The interface needs to be flexible, a list of 10 documents needs to be as easy to navigate as a list of 1,000 documents.

Screen space is a valuable resource and as such, files, information, buttons, etc. need to be packed into the smallest area possible without making them look ugly, unusable, or difficult to find.


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